My Work Study Experience

My Work Study Experience
by Emilie Peedin

                College is a hard time for everyone involved, especially being on an equestrian team. Between your team, classes, homework, clubs and maintaining a social life, its hard to find time for much else. So how could you possibly factor in a way to also receive some extra spending money for your time at St. Andrews University? Finding a good work study position that you enjoy while also having time for everything else will be challenging but very rewarding.


Foggy morning, ready to bring in horses

 

Continue reading “My Work Study Experience”

Pre-Veterinary Program at St. Andrews University

By Barbara-Ann Grantham

Pre Veterinary Interns at WorkSt. Andrews University has a Pre-Veterinary Program.  The program is not a major, but rather it is designed to help students meet the entrance requirements of veterinary schools regardless of their major (however, the majority of students in this program are Biology majors).  This program offers students the chance to gain hands-on experience.  Students in the Pre-Veterinary Program must keep their grades up to stay on track and avoid falling behind.  St. Andrews University’s Pre-Veterinarian Program’s mission is to prepare its students with the knowledge and skills necessary to gain acceptance in a veterinary program of their choice, and for its students to later be successful as a professional in this field.  Continue reading “Pre-Veterinary Program at St. Andrews University”

SAU MBA Program

by Rob Jacobs, RLJ Stables LLC

Rob JacobsI’m Rob Jacobs and my MBA degree from St. Andrews University was conferred in May of 2017. Since completing my MBA from St. Andrews I have continued growing and developing my business RLJ Stables, LLC. Also, I have begun working on the required courses towards a doctoral degree in Management from Walden University. RLJ Stables, LLC is a freelance equestrian service related business I own and operate that was established in October 2015 to educate equestrians across North Carolina, as well as give riders the confidence they need in order to be successful with their horses. Balancing my time between my business and school work requires me to manage my time well which was something I had an opportunity to practice during my courses at St. Andrews.

The practicum courses gave me quality time to work along side the faculty to develop and strengthen my company’s business and marketing plans. I was able to use some of the faculty members as resources to ensure my plans were accurate and realistic. Having such a strong team gave me the confidence I needed to strengthen the sections of the business plan that needed further development. I am grateful I was able to be a part of a program that is dedicated to helping the students succeed. I look forward to passing on some of the knowledge I gained during my time at St. Andrews.

St. Andrews Equestrian Program is dedicated to the development of future leaders in the equine industry. The program is home to the 2016 and 2017 Intercollegiate Horse Show Association (IHSA) National Champions in Western Horsemanship. The Hunter Seat team is regularly represented at IHSA Nationals and the Intercollegiate Dressage Association (IDA) team has sent riders to the National Championships nearly every year since 2002. Students also ride at USHJA and USEF rated shows as well as attending schooling shows.

A small liberal arts and sciences university, St. Andrews majors include Business, Biology and Therapeutic Horsemanship.

Click here to request more information about St. Andrews University and Equestrian program.

Helmet Fit Article

This article that appeared in the AQHA journal in August 2017 is an interview with Coach Carla Wennberg with photos of Rob Jacobs, Syd Orr and Grace Wadford.

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St. Andrews Equestrian Program is dedicated to the development of future leaders in the equine industry. The program is home to the 2016 and 2017 Intercollegiate Horse Show Association (IHSA) National Champions in Western Horsemanship. The Hunter Seat team is regularly represented at IHSA Nationals and the Intercollegiate Dressage Association (IDA) team has sent riders to the National Championships nearly every year since 2002. Students also ride at USHJA and USEF rated shows as well as attending schooling shows.

A small liberal arts and sciences university, St. Andrews majors include Business, Biology and Therapeutic Horsemanship.

Click here to request more information about St. Andrews University and Equestrian program.

 

CHA International Conference

Carla Wennberg

 

Carla spent last weekend at the Certified Horsemanship Association (CHA) International Conference hosted by Middle Tennessee State University in Murfreesboro, TN.

“This was a great experience,” said Carla. “I taught people of all different levels from all over the country.” Her topic was Western Horsemanship Exercises and her general lesson plan included balancing exercises in transitions, the steps of collection required, steering exercises to control the shoulders of both horse and rider and mental preparation required for the horsemanship rider as they prepare for pattern work.

“It was challenging to present this at levels appropriate for riders of different experiences,” said Carla. “I think I did a pretty good job of explaining the concepts and challenging each of the riders.’

Carla was scheduled to present Western Horsemanship Exercises but due to another clinician being unable to make it to the conference also presented on the topic of Exercises for Multiple Students at Different Levels. The catalog described this session in the following way.

When scheduling students for riding lessons, the ideal would be “like ability and like age” to ride together, but with busy families and multiple activities this can be impossible.  An instructor must be able to plan lesson content that can be adapted for all abilities or skill levels, hunter or western, male or female, adult or child. This session will give you many exercises to take home and start teaching!

Having already clearly demonstrated this skill in her own session, I suspect Carla was well prepared to fill in on this session.

Head Coaches – What to they bring to the job?

2016 graduate Katie Thomas recently interviewed the St. Andrews Intercollegiate Head Coaches as part of her Interdisciplinary Studies major.

KT: How long have you been in the Equine world either riding or coaching?

 Robin Brooks Head IHSA Hunter Seat Coach. “I have always been around horses, my parents are also involved in the equine industry so I have been involved in horses my whole life. I started horse showing when I was around five, and started showing in the children’s jumpers at 10. I would say that is when I made the decision to makes this a career.

 Carla Wennberg Head IHSA Western Coach. “I have been a professional in the horse industry for 35 years. I have been a college instructor for 25 years, University of Georgia, Colorado State University before St. Andrews.”

 Jackie Dwelle Head IDA Dressage Coach. “I started riding at the age of 8 and have not looked back. I have worked as a groom, barn manager, instructor, administrator, coach and mentor.”

KT: What do you consider to be your top three strengths as a coach?

 Robin Brooks Head IHSA Hunter Seat Coach.

“1. Keeping it simple – riding isn’t brain surgery, some people like to over complicate things, or talk over people’s heads to make themselves sound better. I think that as a rider and a trainer, I do a good job of keeping things as clear and as easy to understand for both my horses and my riders.

2. Keeping it positive – I never lie to my students, however, I try to always keep the experience as positive for both horse and rider as possible.

3. I try to do a good job of catering to my students learning styles.”

 Carla Wennberg Head IHSA Western Coach. “Ethics and Hard Work”

 Jackie Dwelle Head IDA Dressage Coach. “Patience, a clear system for instructing and coaching, good communication skills.”

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Head Coaches – Learning from Mistakes

2016 graduate Katie Thomas recently interviewed the St. Andrews Intercollegiate Head Coaches as part of her Interdisciplinary Studies major.

KT: What have you learned from mistakes on the job?

Robin Brooks Head IHSA Hunter Seat Coach. “As a rider, I think that the biggest mistake that I have learned from is not knowing when to ask for help. The amazing thing about this sport is that we never stop learning. When I was younger I was scared to ask too many questions, I have definitely learned from that.

As an instructor, the most important thing that I have learned from a mistake is not to push students too hard. There is a fine line between pushing someone to their limit, and pushing them past that limit.

As a rider, and a trainer, my biggest mistake has been not knowing when to say that enough is enough. “Practice doesn’t make perfect, perfect practice makes perfect”, has been drilled into my head for I don’t know how many years. However, when working with horses, every day cannot be perfect. I have learned that sometimes it is in everyone’s best interest to go for a long walk and come back tomorrow.”

Carla Wennberg Head IHSA Western Coach. “I work very hard at the Mental prep for everything because riders are not as successful without it (past experience).”

Jackie Dwelle Head IDA Dressage Coach. “Some people need to be pushed and challenged and others need to be encouraged and rewarded to bring out their best. It is sometimes difficult to know what will work with a rider until you do some experimenting. Of course, that can be frustrating for both the coach and the rider”

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Head Coach – Guiding Principals

2016 graduate Katie Thomas recently interviewed the St. Andrews Intercollegiate Head Coaches as part of her Interdisciplinary Studies major.

KT: Briefly, could you tell me about your coaching philosophy?

Robin Brooks Head IHSA Hunter Seat Coach. “I believe in developing confident and empathic riders. I think that as coaches it is our job to make our riders feel confident about their abilities, and to help them to better understand and appreciate their horses.”

Carla Wennberg Head IHSA Western Coach. “Mental prep is key to winning. Riders MUST be athletic and fit. Riders must WANT to be a part of the team, not stand alone. ”

Jackie Dwelle Head IDA Dressage Coach. “Coaching is all about preparing students to participate in the job of competing. They need to view the competition as a job to be done and not allow the pressures of competition to get in their way. In addition to being able to ride, they need to be mentally tough to handle whatever comes their way in the competitive arena”

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